Dr. Rosamina De La Rosa
21 Summit Street
Parsippany, NJ 07054
973-257-0707

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Posts for: November, 2014

By Rosamina De La Rosa DDS, FAGD, PA
November 19, 2014
Category: Oral Health
TVDesignGuruNateBerkusSharestheSecretsBehindHisDazzlingSmile

Perhaps you've seen Nate Berkus on The Oprah Winfrey Show or watched his television program, The Nate Berkus Show. You may even have read his best-selling book, Home Rules: Transform the Place You Live Into a Place You'll Love. Regardless of where or how you discovered Berkus, you will surely have noticed his dazzling smile.

Berkus recently opened up about the facts behind his trademark smile during an interview with Dear Doctor magazine. First off, his smile is totally natural, as he never wore braces or had any cosmetic work, including porcelain veneers. However, Berkus does give credit to his childhood dentist for the preventative healthcare he received as a young boy. “I'm grateful for having been given fluoride treatments and sealants as a child,” he said. Nate also shared the important flossing advice he learned from his dentist that he still follows today: “Floss the ones you want to keep.” Berkus went on to say that he feels, “healthy habits should start at a young age.”

And we totally agree! For this reason we have put together the following list of facts and oral hygiene tips:

  • Over 50% of plaque accumulation occurs in the protected areas between teeth — a place that may be difficult or even impossible to reach with a toothbrush.
  • A thorough brushing may take up to two minutes at first, and it may feel awkward as you reach some places in your mouth.
  • Remember, more is NOT always better! Brushing or flossing too hard can be damaging to your teeth and gums. And never saw back and forth with your floss.

To learn more about oral hygiene, including brushing and flossing techniques, you can continue reading the Dear Doctor article “Oral Hygiene Behavior - Dental Health For Life.” Or you can contact us today to schedule an appointment so that we can conduct a thorough examination, review your brushing and flossing techniques, and discuss any questions you have as well as treatment options. As needed, we will work with you to teach you the proper brushing and flossing techniques so that you feel confident before you leave our office. And to read the entire interview with Nate Berkus, please see the Dear Doctor article “Nate Berkus.”


By Rosamina De La Rosa DDS, FAGD, PA
November 03, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay   oral health   nutrition  
PlanYourSportsNutritionandHydrationtoReduceToothDecayRisk

If you or your family has an active sports lifestyle, you probably already know the importance of food and liquids for energy and hydration. But what you eat and drink (and how often) could unintentionally increase your teeth’s susceptibility to tooth decay. With that in mind, you should plan your nutrition and hydration intake for strenuous exercise to maximize energy and reduce the risk of tooth decay.

On the general health side, carbohydrates are your main source of energy for sports or exercise activity. You should eat a substantial carbohydrate-based meal (such as pasta, cereal or sandwiches) a few hours before a planned event. An hour before, you can snack on something easily digestible (avoiding anything fatty) to prevent hunger and as additional energy fuel.

It’s also important to increase your liquid intake before strenuous activity to avoid dehydration, usually a couple of hours before so that your body has time to eliminate excess fluid. During the activity, you should drink three to six ounces of water or sports drink every ten to twenty minutes to replace fluid lost from perspiration.

While water is your best hydration source, sports drinks can be helpful — they’re designed to replace electrolytes (sodium) lost during strenuous, non-stop activity lasting more than 60 to 90 minutes. They should only be consumed in those situations; your body gains enough from a regular nutritional diet to replace lost nutrients during normal activity.

In relation to your oral health, over-consumption of carbohydrates (like sugar) can increase your risk of tooth decay. The acid in most sports drinks also poses a danger: your teeth’s enamel dissolves (de-mineralizes) in too acidic an environment. For these reasons, you should restrict your intake of these substances — both what you eat and drink and how often you consume them. You should also practice regular oral hygiene by brushing and flossing daily, waiting an hour after eating or drinking to brush giving your saliva time to wash away food particles and neutralize the acid level in your mouth.

Knowing what and when to eat or drink is essential to optimum performance and gain in your physical activities. Along with good oral hygiene, it can also protect your oral health.

If you would like more information on the best sports-related diet for both general and oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Nutrition for Sports.”